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Xavier Magazine

Chapter Spotlight

While 400 athletes celebrated their track and field victories, the Milwaukee chapter commemorated its own milestone. This year marked the 10th anniversary of the chapter’s involvement with the city’s Special Olympics. “One of our roles is to yell and scream and make them feel like a million bucks,” says chapter president and 1979 graduate David Burpee. Once a group completes all the events, the 20 or 30 chapter members who participate annually line up the athletes according to their rank and award them their ribbons—making a lot of noise when the athlete is announced.

“We get more out of it then they do,” Burpee says. “The smiles on their faces, the enthusiasm they bring. We feed off their energy.”

This year’s event took place at Nicolet High School in Glendale, Wis., and Burpee says that many alumni now bring their children. “One member wanted to bring an entire youth group,” Burpee says. “I encouraged it.”

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Xavier Magazine

Change of Plans

If you’ve subscribed to a tuition payment plan, your bill usually reflects this by listing the partial payment amount. Due to an administrative software system change, however, the office of the bursar is unable to list these individual payments and have sent out bills with the total amount due. The office is in the process of creating a payment plan component for this new system, which will be ready at the start of the spring semester.

In the meantime, simply divide your balance on the first bill in July by five months to determine the payment amount, then by four in August, three in September and two in October. You should pay the remaining balance in November. Simply monitor the balance throughout the semester to insure it is progressing towards zero.

The office of the bursar can also automatically charge your bank account each month to make your payment. To authorize this, simply visit www.xavier.edu/bursar and print the automatic bank account draft payment form, complete and sign it, attach a voided check and mail it to the bursar. The bursar draws only the amount you instruct regardless of your balance so please look at your statement each month to see if you are making the appropriate progress in your payment plan.

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Xavier Magazine

Amazing Grace

When Amy Douglas walked into her student teaching seminar in 2000, she recognized several familiar faces, but couldn’t attach any names to them. Three months earlier, a car accident left her in a coma for seven days and with the effects of traumatic brain injury. Fortunately, she recovered at a quicker pace than most, and after a month-long stay in the hospital, she was ready to return to Xavier to finish her M.Ed.

“I simply needed to finish what I had started,” Douglas says. “The encouragement was there, the support—I wanted to get my life back on a somewhat familiar track.”

Against her doctor’s advice, and unable to drive due to recurring seizures, the 36-year-old mother of four relied on her husband and parents to transport her to class—often scheduled back-to-back on Saturdays—and to student teaching assignments. Douglas, who graduated in May, now says she wants to work with adults who have suffered traumatic brain injury.

“I am truly moved by the work being done in the area of adult learning disabilities and, most specifically, the pursuit of higher education by these adults,” she says.

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Xavier Magazine

Getting a Jump on Knees

Women athletes come to Xavier dreaming of big wins and hearty workouts. But one of the first things they’re asked to do is to jump off an eight-inch box. As they jump, head athletic trainer Jody Jenike videotapes. Every motion of the body is then analyzed to determine those at risk for knee injuries and what type of strength training or rehabilitation program each athlete needs.

The goal, Jenike says, is to avoid the traumatic knee injuries that plague female athletes at a rate as much as nine times greater than their male counterparts. Theories about why women athletes suffer more knee problems range from physiological differences in strength and skeletal structure to the fact that women’s strength training in high school is lacking. “By the time they get to us, they’ve had one or two injuries,” Jenike says. “We’re just trying to figure out why and what factors you can control.”

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Xavier Magazine

Peruvian Peck of Peppers

Carlos Alcantara was looking forward to spreading out into the empty seat next to him on the red-eye from San Francisco to Miami. Then a woman boarded at the last minute, introduced herself and took the seat next to him. His plans suddenly changed. Only he had no idea by how much.

The two chatted throughout the flight, and by the time the plane landed, they had already made plans to see each other again. The chance meeting led to marriage two years later and a professional partnership as well. Together, Carlos and Shanda Alcantara formed Chalaco Corp., a manufacturer and importer of aha!, a line of marinades, hot sauces and pepper pastes from Peru, Carlos’ home country.

“These are new flavors for the American palate—peppers that are mostly about flavors rather than heat,” says Carlos, a 1991 M.B.A. graduate. “When the time came to name our product line we selected and trademarked the name aha! since the Peruvian term for chili peppers is pronounced ‘aaahee.’ ”

Of course, both brought extensive experience to this almost 6-year-old venture. After a 20-year career at Procter and Gamble, Alcantara was recruited by the Clorox Co. to oversee sales in Latin America. He later became president of Penzoil-Quaker State International Corp., a position that made him one of a few Hispanic Americans to head a multi-national company. Meanwhile, Shanda, a hotelier, restaurateur and gourmet cook, traveled to Peru where she took classes at the Lima Culinary Institute. After positive feedback from friends, the couple decided to market Peruvian flavors to the U.S.

The company, which has operations in Las Vegas, California and Peru, holds cooking contests with a culinary trip to Peru as the prize and helps improve the lives of the country’s poor farmers. “We enjoy the fact that we can be together a lot more than if we worked in different businesses,” Carlos says. “We get to spend our work time together—we actually enjoy this.”

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