A Healthy Future

When Xavier began studying the possibilities of acquiring Edgecliff College in the late 1970s, one of the components that made the idea so attractive was Edgecliff’s nursing program. Xavier didn’t have a nursing program, the need for nurses was growing and the whole concept of nursing fit in seamlessly with the Jesuit philosophy of serving others.

What no one at the time could have possibly foreseen, though, was what an important component the nursing program would become to Xavier, not only to the academic vitality of the University today, but also to its future.

In the 10-year period between 1996-2006, the program’s enrollment more than quadrupled, making it the second-largest undergraduate program at the University behind liberal arts, and the fourth-largest graduate program at the University. What makes nursing so vital, though, is that it has also become a leader in integrating and innovating its courses, offering video classes for nurses in rural areas, creating cutting-edge programs such as the clinical nurse leader and forging interdisciplinary dual degrees with Xavier’s master’s programs in business, education and criminal justice.
[See a listing of Xavier’s health-related programs]
And that fits perfectly with Xavier’s future goals. In light of successful programs in nursing, pre-med, health services administration, among others, plans are being developed to increase Xavier’s visibility as an institution known for its health-related programs.

“It’s become apparent to a number of people that health-related programs are one of our strengths, and you can see that manifested in all three colleges,” says academic vice president and provost Roger Fortin. “These programs, collectively, reflect and are very much in keeping with our Jesuit, Catholic identity and mission.”

It also ties in perfectly with the academic vision University President Michael J. Graham, S.J., set forth when he took over leadership of Xavier 10 years ago: Grow the academy through such areas as interdisciplinary courses, academic innovation and program development. That progress can be seen in such areas as the Williams College of Business and the School of Education, both of which had strong foundations upon which they built their progress in the last decade. While health-related programs are not concentrated in a single college or school, they have the same strong foundation and an even greater potential for growth. And, says Fortin, that will happen.

The effort is actually being driven not by the administration but by the faculty. With some sort of health issue woven into nearly every program, the faculty are the ones who either create new individual programs or work together to create the interdisciplinary programs.

“We should be expressing this health focus more strongly as part of our identity,” Fortin says. “We should be developing new programs. We should be aligning ourselves with those things that we do well. We should be asking ourselves, What can we do better? There’s a consciousness about this now, and you are going to see a more intentional effort to do these things.”

WOX Grants

In just its second year, Xavier’s Women of Excellence has become a fundraising force. The group’s Giving Circle raised more than $60,000 this year, with nearly all of it directed to nine projects proposed by faculty or student organizations. In its first year, $45,500 in grants were awarded to 31 projects. The projects emphasize the development of women in areas where they have been historically underrepresented. “One of our goals with the Giving Circle is to give through the lens of a woman,” says Norah Mock, WOX executive director. This year’s projects are:

• Nexus Community Garden, which brings the communities of Norwood and Evanston together with Xavier in developing an urban, sustainable community garden: $7,225.
• One in Four Day, which brings attention to sexual violence on college campuses: $6,500.
• Tuition Runs Out Day, which encourages students to give back to the University in support of future generations of Xavier students: $9,290.
• Women of Xavier Chemistry, which highlights opportunities for women in science fields: $5,500.
• Creating Relationships of Justice and Care, which includes requiring freshmen to attend an event exploring the issues of sexual relationships and the “hook-up” culture: $9,955.
• Career Road Trips to the Real World, which offers students a two-day program of on-site visits where they can see how their majors are used in different industries: $3,425.
• Retention and Success of Female African American Students, which researches why a disproportionate number of African American women leave Xavier before graduation and what can be done to remove barriers to their academic success: $7,220.
• Summer Service Internship Program, which places 20 Xavier students into paid summer internships to provide service to local disenfranchised populations, discover leadership possibilities and earn income: $5,000.
• Xavier Mentoring Program, which offers mentors to Xavier students and which needs financial support for campus-wide marketing to be successful: $4,000.

Smith Hall

The building that will house the Williams College of Business is now officially known as Stephen and Dolores Smith Hall in honor of 1968 graduate Stephen S. Smith and his wife, whose donations helped fund construction of the building. Smith, a member of Xavier’s board of trustees, was a partner in Brandywine Global Investment Strategies, now part of Legg Mason. The Smiths have established scholarships at Xavier and provide the Bloomberg financial data terminals for the student investment fund. Xavier’s mission prompted their gifts: “If your goal in business is money, I don’t think that’s the ultimate happiness,” Smith says. “The ultimate happiness is to be in business, be successful and have a moral compass. That’s what I really like about what the University is doing—the idea of forming the whole person who gives back to society. It isn’t just the education: It’s the commitment to the whole person.”

Blessed Event

As students were moving out of the dorms in May, University President Michael J. Graham, S.J., spoke of the day in August 2011 when students would be doing exactly the opposite—moving into Xavier’s new residence hall. With construction underway behind him, Graham presided over an official blessing of the ground on which the hall and dining complex are being built. Slowed by recent knee surgery, Graham turned to Al Bischoff, S.J., a residence hall minister, and Darrell Burns, S.J., to conduct the prayer and sprinkle the holy water. The 240,000-square-foot complex will house about 535 students in four connected buildings. The dining hall will seat up to 800 and replaces Hoff Marketplace in the Cintas Center. The new dining hall retains the Hoff name to honor the late James E. Hoff, S.J., former Xavier chancellor.

Countdown to the Quad

The clock is ticking. In just a few weeks, Xavier’s campus will be forever changed with the opening of two new buildings that will revolutionize the student learning experience and dramatically enhance the campus environment. The two new buildings—Steven and Dolores Smith Hall, the new home of the Williams College of Business, and the Conaton Learning Commons—collectively form the James E. Hoff, S.J., Academic Quad. A grand opening is planned for August.
Stay updated on the latest developments at theCountdown to the Quad web site:

• Explore the buildings – Specially created interactive maps allow users to explore both buildings, floor by floor, getting details about the many spaces that will allow students and faculty to interact and create a learning environment unlike any other in the nation.
• View a live web cam – Watch live as the finishing touches are put on the buildings from a camera placed on top of Schott Hall.
Receive Twitter updates. Follow the progress of the buildings through Twitter tweets that offer details about the projects from members of the construction teams.
• Set your watches – Count the time left, down to the second, until the first classes meet in the buildings in August with a special countdown clock.
• Speed up time – Watch the buildings rise from the ground with a special time lapse video that follows the construction of the buildings from the site clearance to the finishing touches.
• Watch and learn – Watch a series of videos that provide insights into the various stages of construction.
• Learn the legacy – Find out more about Father Hoff, the former chancellor of Xavier for whom the project is named.

Xavie Year in Review and Faculty Accomplishments

Xavier Year in Review

Each year, more and more magazines recognize Xavier as one of the nation’s most
outstanding academic institutions. This year’s honors include:
• For the 15th straight year, Xavier was ranked among the top 10 Midwest master’s-level colleges and universities, according to U.S. News & World Report. Xavier ranked No. 3 among 146 Midwest colleges and universities. As part of the rankings, Xavier was:
• Ranked No. 1 in student retention for the sixth straight year.
• Ranked No. 1 in average graduation rates.
• Ranked No. 2 in average alumni giving percent.
• Ranked No. 6 in best undergraduate teaching.
• Ranked No. 2 in “Up-and-Coming Schools.”

• Rated as a “good school for first-year experiences and service learning.”
• For the sixth straight year, the Williams College of Business was named an outstanding business school by The Princeton Review in its Best 301 Business Schools magazine.
• For the sixth straight year, Xavier was named one of the nation’s top schools for undergraduate entrepreneurship programs by The Princeton Review and Entrepreneur magazine. Xavier is ranked 19th.
• Xavier was named a “Military Friendly School” by GI Jobs magazine.
• Xavier was ranked No. 196 in Forbes magazine’s listing of “America’s Best Colleges.”
• Xavier was named one of the nation’s best institutions for undergraduate education, by The Princeton Review.

Faculty Accomplishments

Each year, Xavier faculty conduct groundbreaking research, produce and present fascinating papers, and receive honors and recognition from a wide variety of organizations. Among this year’s faculty accomplishments are:
Rachel Chrastil, assistant professor in the Department of History, was awarded a Malcolm Bowie Prize by the Society for French Studies at the University of Oxford for her article, “The French Red Cross, War Readiness, and Civil Society, 1866–1914.”
Kathleen Smythe, assistant professor in the Department of History, was named the Bishop Fenwick Teacher of the Year by the Xavier chapter of Alpha Sigma Nu, the Jesuit honor society.
Thomas Hayes, professor of marketing, received the Alice L. Beeman Award for Outstanding Published Scholarship from the Council for Advancement and Support of Education, for his book Marketing Colleges and Universities: A Service Approach.
Ida Critelli Schick, professor and chair/director of the graduate program in Health Services Administration, received the 2009 Teaching and Advising Award from the American College of Healthcare Executives for Ohio.
James Buchanan, director of the Brueggeman Center for Dialogue, delivered the Harry S. Truman Lecture in Kansas City, which was sponsored by the Harry S. Truman Library and Avila University.
Edward P. Hahnenberg, Department of Theology, was a keynote speaker at the National Symposium on Lay Ecclesial Ministry.
The following were awarded Xavier Wheeler Grants: Christine Anderson, Department of History: The Great Migration in the U.S.; Tom Clark, Department of Management and Entrepreneurship: Social Entrepreneurship in the Arts; Graley Herren, Department of English, and George Farnsworth, Department of Biology: Enhancing experiential learning in Ireland; Joseph Wagner, S.J., Department of Mathematics and Computer Science: Enhancing the mathematical preparation of pre-service, secondary mathematics teachers; Shelagh Larkin, Stephanie Brzuzy, School of Social Work, Carol Scheerer, Joan Tunningley, Department of Occupational Therapy, Susan Namei, Barb Harland, School of Nursing, Eddie Hooker, Health Services Administration, and Renee Zucchero, Department of Psychology: A multidisciplinary approach to working with older clients experiencing dementia.

Read more about current rankings for Xavier and Faculty Accomplishments.

Xavier Honor Roll of Donors

Since beginning the To See Great Wonders campaign in 2006, more than $180 million has been donated to the University by alumni and friends. Each individual who supports Xavier has a special place in the University’s success, and to honor that generosity we’ve compiledan honor roll of donors—a list of everyone who has given to Xavier in the last four years.

CAPITAL GIFTS AND GRANTS
• Seats and suites

FATHER FINN SOCIETY 

1831 SOCIETY

ANNUAL FUND
• Undergraduate by class year
• Graduate by college
• Organizations
• Current parent
• Past parent
• Faculty and staff
• Friends

 

Campaign Notebook

Gilligan Scholars | The Institute for Politics and Public Life established an endowed student scholarship in honor of former Ohio Governor John J. Gilligan. The scholarships, which are intended for those interested in public service, are initially being awarded to existing Xavier students with the intent to later expand them to high school seniors as well. The first scholarships are being awarded for the 2010-2011 academic year.

Gov. Gilligan is leading a selection committee to delineate the specific requirements for Gilligan Scholars. These are to include a commitment to public service and written submission articulating the student’s public vision and goals.

This endowment additionally funds a guest lecturer program, bringing renowned national instructors to the Xavier campus. Gov. Gilligan taught English at Xavier after leaving public office. His grandfather was the first basketball coach at Xavier and his father was the first lay person on the board of trustees. To learn more or to contribute to the endowment, go towww.xavier.edu/politicsandpubliclife.

Nursing Grants | Xavier University received the largest federal grant in its 180-year history this summer, an award of almost $1.5 million from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) designated for the School of Nursing. The grant was awarded through HRSA’s Nurse Education, Practice and Retention (NEPR) program, which addresses the nursing shortage by funding projects that strengthen and enhance the capacity for educating and retaining nurses.

The grant is being used to fund a three-year project to provide master’s-level education and continuing education credits to nurses working in rural areas through the use of high-definition video conferencing. This high-tech method enables nurses at rural sites to participate in real-time courses with nursing students and faculty on Xavier’s campus, thus strengthening the nursing workforce throughout the state and improving nurse retention and quality of patient care.

Up to seven rural health care organizations are scheduled to be part of the video-conferencing project, with at least 20 students each year from organizations and surrounding areas taking part beginning this fall. Nurses participating in the program earn a Master of Science in Nursing and are trained in the new emerging health care role of clinical nurse leader.

Also, two continuing education events are being offered through distance learning each year to nurses in rural areas as part of the grant.
The grant from HRSA, which is a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, came just ahead of two other grants received by the School of Nursing, both from the Ohio Board of Nursing for nearly $400,000.

One of the state grants enables the school to increase its capacity to prepare pre-licensure nursing students, including traditional undergraduates and students in the MIDAS program, which awards Master of Science in Nursing degrees to students with bachelor’s degrees in other disciplines. This grant helps Xavier address the dramatic growth in its nursing programs by creating additional practicum sites through partnerships with two hospitals—TriHealth and Shriners Hospital for Children—and a nursing home—Victoria Retirement Community.

The second grant increases Xavier’s enrollment capacity to prepare graduate level nurses to serve as nurse educators. To direct more nurses into faculty careers, Xavier’s project partners with Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science and the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing and Health to create a pipeline of continuing education from an associate degree program to Xavier’s master’s program to a doctoral program.

Big Dividends

The first decade of the 21st century began with the opening of the Cintas and Gallagher Student centers, and it will end with the unveiling of another set of new and highly anticipated resources. When Phase I of the James E. Hoff, S.J., Academic Quad is completed next August, Xavier University will welcome to campus 170,000 square feet of new and dynamic academic space.

The featured components of the Hoff Academic Quad are the Conaton Learning Commons and new Williams College of Business. Together, these will bring dramatic change to campus and unprecedented learning resources to current and future students. These resources include technological infrastructure, new classrooms, new individual and group learning spaces, and new instructional resources far beyond those available at Xavier today. By combining these resources with greater and more integrated services for students, the University will be in an ideal position to attract, retain and graduate more students than ever before.
“No other college or university in the nation will provide students with a more effective learning environment than the one we’re creating here at Xavier,” says University President Michael J. Graham, S.J.

Much of the credit for this learning environment goes to alumni and friends and their financial support of To See Great Wonders: The Campaign for Xavier. Through September, the campaign has generated more than $185 million toward the goal of $200 million. These funds have enabled Xavier to build the Hoff Academic Quad without compromising the financial integrity of the institution, and to move confidently ahead with plans to replace the aging Alter Hall with a new classroom building and to construct a new residence hall.

These funds have also earned Xavier—and those at the University primarily responsible for philanthropic fundraising—a national award.

Xavier has won a 2009 WealthEngine Award for Educational Fundraising from the Council for the Advancement and Support of Education, or CASE. This award recognizes superior fundraising programs across the country and is part of CASE’s Circle of Excellence program, which honors exemplary advancement initiatives and activities. Xavier is one of only 40 schools nationwide to receive this award. Other winners include highly regarded institutions such as Columbia, Yale, Michigan, UCLA, Villanova, North Carolina and Johns Hopkins.

In a letter announcing the award, CASE President John Lippincott said this of Xavier: “Your institution has not only demonstrated the highest levels of professionalism and best practice in its fundraising efforts, it has contributed to the betterment of educational advancement worldwide.”

The award is based on the analysis of three years of fundraising data. “This prestigious honor reflects the leadership of our president, the hard work of our staff and the generosity and passion of our alumni and donors, who continue to strongly support Xavier’s 178-year-old mission of developing men and women for others,” says Gary Massa, Xavier’s Vice President for University Relations. “Thanks to all these supporters, our fundraising success will allow Xavier to revolutionize the student learning experience and dramatically enhance the campus environment.”
The ability to significantly enhance the University through fundraising success is a relatively recent phenomenon at Xavier. To wit:

• One third of all funds raised in Xavier history have been raised in the last five years.
• One half of all funds raised in Xavier history have been raised in the last 10 years.
• Contributions to the Annual Fund have doubled in the last 10 years.
• Membership in The 1831 Society (those who donate $1,000 or more each year) has doubled in the last five years.
• Membership in the Father Finn Society (those who have made planned gifts to the University) has also doubled in the last five years.
• Finally, athletic fundraising has grown from $10,000 to more than $1 million annually since 2002.

This success has put the University on solid financial ground and in a position to better weather the economic troubles on Wall Street and Main Street.
“We’re very fortunate and grateful to be in a strong position financially,” says Massa. “That said, our endowment is much smaller than that of many competitor schools, which limits the amount of financial aid and scholarships we can offer prospective students. Schools like Dayton and Miami can offer more student aid than Xavier can, which causes some worthy students to go elsewhere.

“We’re working hard to eliminate this shortfall. Growing the endowment takes time, and it will be the focus of our next campaign. Based on our success over the past decade, I’m confident that we have the staff and focus to get there.”
The responsibility for fundraising at Xavier involves many individuals across campus but is housed in the Division of University Relations, which includes staff to:

• Meet individually with those alumni and friends who have the financial wherewithal to make gifts of $25,000 or more.
• Appeal broadly to those able to make gifts on an annual basis.
• Connect and engage alumni and friends for the purposes of maintaining and/or enhancing their relationship with Xavier.
• Communicate to alumni and friends about institutional efforts, initiatives and opportunities.
• Document all vital interactions and transactions.

The efforts of these staff members, and those across the University, were further recognized and complimented in August, when U.S. News & World Report released its annual college rankings. Once again, Xavier was prominently positioned in several categories listing the top master’s-level universities in the Midwest:

• Overall, Xavier ranks among the top 10 colleges and universities for the 15th consecutive year, placing No. 3 this year.
• Xavier ranks No. 1 for the best graduation rate and No. 1 for the best rate of retention for freshman students for the seventh consecutive   year.
• Xavier ranks No. 2 in the category of Up and Coming Schools and No. 6 for Best Undergraduate Teaching.
• Finally, Xavier ranks No. 2 for the highest percentage of alumni to donate annually.

“All these rankings are very gratifying and support the fact that we’re clearly succeeding in serving the needs of our students,” says Massa. “Naturally, the alumni giving percentage is very important to me. It’s also very important to the success of our university and will be for generations to come.”

Campaign Notebook

Gilligan Scholars | The Institute for Politics and Public Life established an endowed student scholarship in honor of former Ohio Governor John J. Gilligan. The scholarships, which are intended for those interested in public service, are initially being awarded to existing Xavier students with the intent to later expand them to high school seniors as well. The first scholarships are being awarded for the 2010-2011 academic year.

Gov. Gilligan is leading a selection committee to delineate the specific requirements for Gilligan Scholars. These are to include a commitment to public service and written submission articulating the student’s public vision and goals.

This endowment additionally funds a guest lecturer program, bringing renowned national instructors to the Xavier campus. Gov. Gilligan taught English at Xavier after leaving public office. His grandfather was the first basketball coach at Xavier and his father was the first lay person on the board of trustees. To learn more or to contribute to the endowment, go towww.xavier.edu/politicsandpubliclife.

Nursing Grants | Xavier University received the largest federal grant in its 180-year history this summer, an award of almost $1.5 million from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) designated for the School of Nursing. The grant was awarded through HRSA’s Nurse Education, Practice and Retention (NEPR) program, which addresses the nursing shortage by funding projects that strengthen and enhance the capacity for educating and retaining nurses.

The grant is being used to fund a three-year project to provide master’s-level education and continuing education credits to nurses working in rural areas through the use of high-definition video conferencing. This high-tech method enables nurses at rural sites to participate in real-time courses with nursing students and faculty on Xavier’s campus, thus strengthening the nursing workforce throughout the state and improving nurse retention and quality of patient care.

Up to seven rural health care organizations are scheduled to be part of the video-conferencing project, with at least 20 students each year from organizations and surrounding areas taking part beginning this fall. Nurses participating in the program earn a Master of Science in Nursing and are trained in the new emerging health care role of clinical nurse leader.

Also, two continuing education events are being offered through distance learning each year to nurses in rural areas as part of the grant.
The grant from HRSA, which is a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, came just ahead of two other grants received by the School of Nursing, both from the Ohio Board of Nursing for nearly $400,000.

One of the state grants enables the school to increase its capacity to prepare pre-licensure nursing students, including traditional undergraduates and students in the MIDAS program, which awards Master of Science in Nursing degrees to students with bachelor’s degrees in other disciplines. This grant helps Xavier address the dramatic growth in its nursing programs by creating additional practicum sites through partnerships with two hospitals—TriHealth and Shriners Hospital for Children—and a nursing home—Victoria Retirement Community.

The second grant increases Xavier’s enrollment capacity to prepare graduate level nurses to serve as nurse educators. To direct more nurses into faculty careers, Xavier’s project partners with Good Samaritan College of Nursing and Health Science and the University of Cincinnati College of Nursing and Health to create a pipeline of continuing education from an associate degree program to Xavier’s master’s program to a doctoral program.